30 comments

    1. @Heath Doheny I understand that part but what I meant to say is that after 911, there were many hate crimes. Many people from the Middle East were killed because the suspect thought that they were involved and or the suspect was racist.

  1. There are quite a few other reasons to be skeptical of hate laws. (1) Proving that hatred is a motivation is costly and difficult. (2) Attributing motivation to a specific emotion can be quite subjective. It allows a jury or a judge to penalize criminals on subjective grounds. This can be a source of injustice. (3) Harm to others than the actual victim is not actually proven. It is presumed, and the criminal is punished for this unproven crime. This is unjust. (4) The externality theory is faulty because all sorts of crimes may intimidate non-victims or potential victims. If people are to be punished using a theory of crime, that theory should be broad enough and accurate enough to be fair over all similar cases. (5) Restitution to victims is typically disregarded by our criminal justice system. Hate crime legislation continues this feature. It adds to it by focusing on added penalties. (6) Over time, as laws and cases multiply, people can eventually be accused of libelous or seditious hate crimes involving vehement speech when they are biased against a group or merely do not like it or its policies. People can eventually be accused of hate crimes when they use hateful speech. Hate crimes laws are a seed that can sprout in new directions. (7) Perhaps hatred as a motivation will eventually be used as grounds for letting the criminal off the hook. Some clever lawyer will argue that the person’s hatred was uncontrollable or instilled by forces beyond his control.
    I’d add that there is no limit to the number of human groupings one can think of by characteristics. At present some groups are covered by hate crime laws and others are not. This unequal treatment of the law will predictably generate pressure for extension of hate laws to more and more groups. Even now, hate laws can be very broadly written so that the hatred is directed against people who vary by such characteristics as race, sexual preference, religion, ethnic group, marital status, political ideology, age, and parental status.
    Hate laws are a veritable Pandora’s Box. They can be used to tack on additional penalties or to gain leverage over suspects by threatening additional charges of “hate.” It is rather easy to fake the appearance of a hate crime, apparently to gain sympathy for one’s group.

    1. I’m not surprised he decided other people’s lives don’t matter. He got that message from somewhere.

  2. If I remember he killed them because he was an incel…. not because they were asian.🤷‍♂️

    1. Remember the days when you accused someone of being racist you had to actually prove it?

      Man time does fly.

    2. “Say no to hate crimes”
      Do you see something wrong with delivering that message? Is it being legitimate more important than understanding and spreading the word?

    3. It doesn’t matter MSNBC needs to race bate while ignoring other racist attacks on asains because…well, black on asain asults .

  3. That was like a month ago.
    **looks at calendar**
    America should be due for another one any day now.

  4. You see now if only yall got on the Falcons this hard maybe they wouldnt choke every other game. Well…….maybe not. Yall pulled hard for the Braves and they still found a way to blow it. Just the ways of Chokelanta i guess.

  5. Prayers to everyone
    However it’s crazy how fast a hate crime was passed for Asians and there has been soo many cases of black hate crime massacres and nothing happens
    We can’t even get an anti lynching bill passed

  6. Look at the likes ratio..
    just understand the apathy and indifference. Please grab a dictionary and a book a earn an education.

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