25 comments

  1. CNN is reprehensible all the things that are going on in the world right now you can’t help yourself to talk about climate

    1. We let China pollute all the way. If we do not care about their emissions why are we taking away coal mining jobs why are we robbing our workers of oil jobs? So China and Russia can make money. Shame!

    2. @John Smith It’s precisely that attitude which has caused us to ignore climate change. For the most part, we have lost the climate change race. But, we can still mitigate the worst effects of it. We can still prepare for extreme weather events and move towards a life after fossil fuels. Besides, China is overrated.

    3. @adam China and India contribute to the majority of pollution on Earth. And the Paris climate accords do absolutely nothing for the environment. Maybe if we had a real president who started bringing our manufacturing back to the US instead of letting China do it without any environmental standards, climate change could be improved, but we don’t

  2. *Part IV of V* “[This record] doesn’t come as any surprise,” Steig wrote. “Although there is decade-to-decade variability, the underlying trend across most of the continent is warming.” “That warming has been particularly fast on the Antarctic Peninsula — where Esperanza is — in summer (the season [it’s] now in),” Steig said. “So we can expect these sorts of records to be set again and again, even if they aren’t set every single year.” Some temperature models predict the region will see temperatures 40 to 50 degrees above average in the next few days.

  3. Part 7 of 66 The moment was registered at the country’s year-round research station in Hope Bay, Trinity Peninsula, on Antarctica’s northernmost tip. Until yesterday, the highest temperature recorded in the area—and the entire Antarctic continent—was 17.5 C, which was reported on March 24, 2015, also at Base Esperanza.

  4. *Part 9 of 55* “The alternative explanation of natural factors dominating has got even less likely,” he told Reuters. *The last four years have been the hottest since records began in the 19th century.* The IPCC will next publish a formal assessment of the probabilities in 2021. “I would be reluctant to raise to 99-100 percent, but there is no doubt there is more evidence of change in the global signals over a wider suite of ocean indices and atmospheric indices,” said Professor Nathan Bindoff, a climate scientist at the University of Tasmania.

  5. *Paragraph 5 of 5.* Sea-level rise would affect 10 million more people by 2100 if the half-degree extra warming brought a forecast 10cm additional pressure on coastlines. The number affected would increase substantially in the following centuries due to locked-in ice melt. Oceans are already suffering from elevated acidity and lower levels of oxygen as a result of climate change. One model shows marine fisheries would lose 3m tonnes at 2C, twice the decline at 1.5C. Sea ice-free summers in the Arctic, which is warming two to three times faster than the world average, would come once every 100 years at 1.5C, but every 10 years with half a degree more of global warming.

  6. *Paragraph 4 of 5.* At 1.5C the proportion of the global population exposed to water stress could be 50% lower than at 2C, it notes. Food scarcity would be less of a problem and hundreds of millions fewer people, particularly in poor countries, would be at risk of climate-related poverty. At 2C extremely hot days, such as those experienced in the northern hemisphere this summer, would become more severe and common, increasing heat-related deaths and causing more forest fires.
    But the greatest difference would be to nature. Insects, which are vital for pollination of crops, and plants are almost twice as likely to lose half their habitat at 2C compared with 1.5C. Corals would be 99% lost at the higher of the two temperatures, but more than 10% have a chance of surviving if the lower target is reached.

  7. *Paragraph 2 of 5.* “It’s a line in the sand and what it says to our species is that this is the moment and we must act now,” said Debra Roberts, a co-chair of the working group on impacts. “This is the largest clarion bell from the science community and I hope it mobilises people and dents the mood of complacency.” Policymakers commissioned the report at the Paris climate talks in 2016, but since then the gap between science and politics has widened. Donald Trump has promised to withdraw the US – the world’s biggest source of historical emissions – from the accord. The first round of Brazil’s presidential election on Sunday put Jair Bolsonaro into a strong position to carry out his threat to do the same and also open the Amazon rainforest to agribusiness.

  8. *Part 5 of 33* In terms of El Niño and solar temperature influences, 2017 thus far has been most similar to 2006, but 2017 has been 0.3°C hotter than 2006 as well. In a recent Senate committee hearing, Trump’s Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry said that he didn’t believe human carbon pollution is the primary control knob for the Earth’s climate (it is; hence the title of this NASA paper published in the journal Science in 2010), but instead placed most of the blame on “naturally occurring events – the warming and the cooling of our ocean waters.”

  9. *Part 8 of 10* “The preparation of this report […] was a benefit in itself,” said Hans-Otto Pörtner, an ecologist at Germany’s Alfred Wegener Institute, who chairs an IPCC working group. “But it also comes with some wishful thinking that the messages are being taken up by the public, by policymakers and by governments.” The IPCC report pointed out that there would be significant differences between a 1.5 degree world and 2 degrees of global warming. Under a 2-degree scenario, the proportion of people exposed to heat waves at least once every five years would leap from 15 to 37 percent.

  10. Inhaling that soot must be detrimental to their health, they should make an in depth segment about that too.

  11. Well, since domestic violence and domestic abuse is on the rise in NYC? The census bureau should research how.people employees, supervisors, managers, and etc was able to sustain the same position at the same company for ten years, or more. Also research and find out these same employees have domestic violence, or are they contributing to domestic violence. Thanksgiving and Christmas is are very great holidays to find out the truth.

  12. Check the temperature averages over the last 100 years and see what the increase is. I believe you will find the raise of 1.6 degrees over the last 100 years.

  13. *Paragraph 5 of 5.* The report also shows there’s no avoiding the costs of climate change; we either invest now to clamp down on greenhouse gases, or we pay down the line through property damage and lost lives. The additional sea level rise of going from 1.5°C to 2°C would put another 10 million people at risk, for example. Another key finding is that every bit of warming matters, so every fraction of a degree we can knock off the global thermostat will pay dividends across economies.

  14. *Paragraph 4 of 5.* As expected, the report doesn’t pull any punches: Staying at or below 1.5°C requires slashing global greenhouse g@s emissions 45 percent below 2010 levels by 2030 and reaching net zero by 2050. Meeting this goal demands extraordinary transitions in transportation; in energy, land, and building infrastructure; and in industrial systems. It means reducing our current coal consumption by one-third. It also demands a vast scale-up of emerging technologies, such as those that remove carbon dioxide directly from the air. All in the very narrow window of the next 12 years while our momentum pushes us in the wrong direction.

  15. *Paragraph 2 of 5.* From rising sea levels to more devastating droughts to more damaging storms, the report makes brutally clear that warming will make the world worse for us in the forms of famine, disease, economic tolls, and refugee crises. And there is a vast gulf between the devastation from 1.5°C, what’s considered the moderate level of average warming, and 2°C. “It’s very clear that half a degree matters,” said Valérie Masson-Delmotte, co-chair of IPCC Working Group I at a press conference in Incheon, South Korea, where the report was released.

  16. *Part 8 of 10* “The preparation of this report […] was a benefit in itself,” said Hans-Otto Pörtner, an ecologist at Germany’s Alfred Wegener Institute, who chairs an IPCC working group. “But it also comes with some wishful thinking that the messages are being taken up by the public, by policymakers and by governments.” The IPCC report pointed out that there would be significant differences between a 1.5 degree world and 2 degrees of global warming. Under a 2-degree scenario, the proportion of people exposed to heat waves at least once every five years would leap from 15 to 37 percent.

  17. *Part 7 of 10* The aim of the report was to follow up on the Paris Agreement, a set of targets to limit climate change signed at a UN summit in Paris, France, in 2015. Scientists have warned that, even if all pledges under the agreement are implemented, humans will still emit around 58 gigatonnes of CO2 in 2030, far beyond the 35gt needed to halt global warming at 1.5 degrees. The report highlights a number of potential pathways to prevent further warming, including removing carbon from the atmosphere, phasing out coal and reducing food waste.

  18. *Part 4 of 10* The report, published today by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, said that crucial policies to reduce global warming must be in place by 2030 to avoid the worst. If emissions continue at the current rate, 1.5 degrees of warming could be reached between 2030 and 2052, and temperatures would continue to rise steeply, the IPCC authors said. According to the _United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,_ Earth has already warmed by nearly a degree since 1900 due to carbon emissions from industry, farming, heating, and transport. Stabilizing global warming to 1.5 degrees above pre-industrial level is possible, the authors of the report said. But, they added, meeting the goal will depend entirely on the political will of all countries.

  19. 5 of 5 *We’re two-thirds of the way there now, and in 12 years, that is the tipping point at which we cannot affect anything anymore.* In other words, that’s when it goes beyond a 1.5 degree increase in global average temperatures and the “feedback loop” that is the Earth will deteriorate to a point where we will have no way to stop the process. In fact, with the course we are currently on, it’s going to be double that temperature; we’ve already seen an increase of 1 degree since pre-industrialization, and there’s really nothing slowing it down.

  20. 2 of 5 If we don’t reverse the current trends in a huge way, then extreme drought, floods, wildfires, food shortages for millions of people across the globe will be the norm for everybody. Well, except, perhaps, for those living at one of the poles. “One of the key messages that comes out very strongly from this report is that we are already seeing the consequences of 1 degree C of global warming through more extreme weather, rising sea levels and diminishing Arctic sea ice, among other changes,” said Panmao Zhai, co-chair of IPCC Working Group I.

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