Marilyn Mosby On Permanently Halting Prosecution Of Drug Charges: ‘Our Violent Crime Went Down 20%’ 1

Marilyn Mosby On Permanently Halting Prosecution Of Drug Charges: ‘Our Violent Crime Went Down 20%’

 

In Baltimore, State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby announced that a policy enacted at the start of the pandemic, which stopped prosecution of drug and prostitution charges, would become permanent. Mosby says, “For over a year, we basically came out and said we're not going to prosecute these low-level offenses … The drug arrests went down by 80%. The number of individuals going in and out of jails went down by 39%." Aired on 04/12/2021.
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Marilyn Mosby On Permanently Halting Prosecution Of Drug Charges: ‘Our Violent Crime Went Down 20%’

19 comments

  1. We need to end the for profit private prison industry. Imprisoning humans should not be a Wall Street Street investment strategy

  2. Very interesting…. if these low level offenses don’t matter then wouldn’t it be the responsibility of the legislature to strike the laws from the books? Also part of the reason that the subsequent low level arrears went down is because the cops obviously got the point and realized it’s pointless to arrest people when the DA won’t file charges.

  3. tickets and court fees police Target people of color does making crime profitable. Private prison industry

  4. He made his choice! He chose a life of crime! You love him so dang much you should have invited to marry your daughter!

  5. “These low level crimes never had anything to do with public safety.” Umm, yeah? It all started with Richard Nixon, and it should have ended when he resigned in disgrace!

  6. So if you arrest less people and prosecute less people , less people go into jail. Duh!! It doesn’t make the community better.

  7. 1. What is the generalizability of the experiment? Can it be generalized across the country? States? Neighborhood? If it is:
    2. Can it be replicated accordingly to meet the scientific standard using independent researchers with no conflicts of interest. Reliability is mandatory.
    3. Reducing drug recording for lower-level crime is not solving the underlying problems that often time-driven people to use the drugs that leading to drug-induced problems in the first place. Doing this would make the court system/judges appearing as if they are running away from their jobs by sweeping social problems under the carpet. This mean, the persistent drug problem only perpetuates more hurt that can pass down to generations in term of the economic disadvancing preventing minority from moving up to the social ladder to be more equal, etc…
    4. Yes, longer the time of prosecution while sending them to complete rehab first.
    Drug addiction, prostitution, domestic violence, and undiagnosed mental health disorders are statistically linked together. So, help them deal with their addiction is the long-term solution.

  8. This kinda reminds me of that pizza commercial where the guy says, “an unanswered call is no complaint at all.”

    In other words the crime is still there, they just won’t acknowledge it anymore.

  9. I think it’s pretty messed up that in a third of this country, you can legally buy weed as easy as you order a pizza. But in some states, you’ll get a prison sentence for holding an eighth.
    Yet 480,000 people die every year from cigarettes versus 0 for weed.
    Like seriously.

  10. Low level offenses have nothing to do with public safety, just increasing revenue for the government and/or the police department… And the bail bond system

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