A shift in Earth's rotation could lead to a 'leap second' 1

A shift in Earth’s rotation could lead to a ‘leap second’

 

Elaina Hyde, the director of Allan I. Carswell Observatory, discusses a change in the Earth's rotation that might lead to a 'leap second.'

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22 comments

    1. @Awake And Aware there is no proof a dome. Beyond our available map earth could be infinite or it could curve into a ball. This flat-ish portion of our realm is known, beyond this portion of our realm is unknown.

    2. @Shawn Hawkins because there is no verifiable proof (24hr recording of Earth’s rotation nor a downward photograph/recording of Earth’s horizon) in existence

    3. @Justin Sherman lol, let me guess, you saw ball earth while looking through an aerodynamic curved window on a plane?

  1. 1 year ~ 365.24 days… we have a leap year every 4 years as the close approximation requires a day be removed for the .24 discrepancy. How insignificant is this millisecond ‘finding’ should be the real question.

    1. It’s all CGI, the ground beneath you is stationary. The sun n moon (exact same size) rotate above our realm, not around

  2. Maybe the shift is actually the cause of the climate change. The poles have shifted and no one really knows if a polar shift is something that takes a long time or happens instantly. All we have are fossils of trees and one could speculate that the climate phenomenon that we see recorded in these specimens could be the aftermath effect of such an event rather than the lead up. It could actually be either way

    1. The poles are moving all the time. Magnetic north has wandered its way into Siberia, moving about 45-55kilometers a year.

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