Achieving Workplace Equity For Black Women | Morning Joe | MSNBC 1

Achieving Workplace Equity For Black Women | Morning Joe | MSNBC

 

Author Minda Harts joins Morning Joe to discuss her book 'The Memo: What Women of Color Need to Know to Secure a Seat at the Table.' Columbia Professor Alexandra Carter and Kat Cole join the discussion. Aired on 04/07/2021.
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Achieving Workplace Equity For Black Women | Morning Joe | MSNBC

35 comments

  1. Force random women (some will be mothers some will be not) to pay child support to the IRS. This will be done to even up child support statistics.

  2. Do people actually get jobs where there they feel like management is invested in their success or cares about them to any personal extent? Lol must be a different America..

    1. I actually feel that way in my company. I receive mentoring and my career goals are regularly addressed. Before working here, I didn’t think it was possible either. We’ve normalized toxic work spaces.

    2. As a journeyman in my field I am highly valued and compensated in the quality of life that I have. I’m also grateful for the women who work with me. Their success is also my success.

    3. Not to mention they are talking about government jobs where it’s illegal to discriminate based on race, and they must have a legitimate reason for disqualifying every candidate… this is just clickbait bs.

    1. 90 % of Nurses are Women, 90 % of Teachers are Women, don’t they accept Men ? Why ? do they not like men. Because its the job field one goes in. Much of the rest is malarkey caused by the media, Politian’s and people that look for quotas not content of character or talent.

  3. The belief is that they should be grateful to be there. To make you feel like you’re taking a spot that you don’t deserve when in fact most times they are very qualified of not over qualified for the position. This for the most part applies to all women but particularly to women of color.

    1. Too bad for your argument, they don’t ask race or gender on the govjobs website, so this is ENTIRELY their qualifications…

  4. The ignorance is the comments from those not effected is entertaining yet disappointing. History matters

    1. Stfu, you have no idea what struggle is, you first world problem is a laugh in the 2nd& 3rd world hahaga

  5. Work for the Government, used that site, took me three years til I was permanent. Racism and nepotism make the hiring processes unequal.

    1. 1. Govjobs doesn’t ask race or gender so try again.
      2. It’s not nepotism to transfer from within. Which is always their priority. Stop trying to be a manager from the start and work your way up like everone else you spoiled pos.

  6. As a recently retired manager, all this talk around getting to know a woman’s needs is a mine field for a manager, especially a male manager. Any question I ask could land me in HR for a million different reasons. I know that managers in general are not willing to take that on. If you want change, re-implement affirmative action.

    1. @Terry Fulds Call it what you want. Let’s be real. If you want America to heal, everyone has to have a seat at the table. All of us have to enjoy what America has to offer or eventually you have a country divided. Sound familiar?

    2. Nobody said a single person should ask this individually. It should be a Management decision to support all workers no matter who they are. Yet women esp mothers have a subset of specific problems and issues in the workplace.

    3. @Mary Ann M It goes without saying that all workers shall be given the same opportunity, but what level of management holds the liability for asking candid questions of workers and hiring practices? The workplace is a minefield today. If you are in management, you better have a lawyer on retainer.

  7. Yep… I applied with the post office as well as state and local government jobs for 25 or more years. It’s more about who you know than what you know. Even with experience and 3 degrees, those jobs stayed elusive. You keep going through second, third, and fourth interviews then you get the “We found someone who better fits our organizational goals and interests” letter. They go and hire someone who has no experience and no common sense as your manager and you have to teach the job to them.

  8. But they don’t ask your race or gender on job apps on the govjobs website… so that’s down to their resume, not their race…

  9. What is so hard about this. Why not just remove names from job applications (indicates gender and race) and just having people provide resume’s with a reference number and no other information that allows the identification of the applicant. Then the company goes on their merit. They can hire an independent firm (since many can still screen during the rounds of interviews). Or they do “video” interviews with the screen black and the voice distorted. All kinds of ways to make sure that no one is chosen based on gender, race or desired identity.

  10. The hushed custard lally level because cucumber temporarily record opposite a sordid fog. empty, material invention

  11. We form groups and lobby for change. The women in my past federal offices meet up out of work and do team building type things (coffee, escape room! ) and talk to each other about the atmosphere at work. Then if there was an issue, one of us or all, depending on the issue/situation would approach leadership. We agreed that “complaining” or broaching issues alone just makes you look like a complainer or all of the black women individually are complainers. Standing together always seemed to get the job done.

  12. It is like they want to go back to the 1950´s it is a trend and it is sickening…..

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