'People Are Stressed; They Are Anxious': The Mental Impact Of A Year In Quarantine | Morning Joe 1

‘People Are Stressed; They Are Anxious’: The Mental Impact Of A Year In Quarantine | Morning Joe

 

Amid rising coronavirus infection rates, the president announced this week that all adults in the U.S. should be eligible to receive the Covid-19 vaccine by April 19. Drs. Dave Campbell and Lucy McBride discuss vaccinations and virus fatigue. Aired on 04/07/2021.
» Subscribe to MSNBC:

About Morning Joe with Joe Scarborough: Join Joe Scarborough, Mika Brzezinski, and Willie Geist, for in-depth and informed discussions that help drive the day's political conversation. Top newsmakers, Washington insiders, journalists, and cultural influencers, come together on Morning Joe for unparalleled insight and analysis around the day's biggest stories.

MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, Hardball, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more.

Connect with MSNBC Online
Visit msnbc.com:
Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter:
Find MSNBC on Facebook:
Follow MSNBC on Twitter:
Follow MSNBC on Instagram:

#Quarantine #MentalImpact #MSNBC

'People Are Stressed; They Are Anxious': The Mental Impact Of A Year In Quarantine | Morning Joe

48 comments

  1. I’m “somewhere in the middle” and I’m scheduled for my second Moderna shot on the 14th. I have…anxiety. I almost can’t sit here much longer. I don’t take drugs and have never taken drugs but I certainly drink more wine than I did b4 the pandemic.

    1. @Kar Walker I’m so sorry for your losses! It’s important for us to realize that vaccinations are to protect the masses. They’re not meant to infringe on individual liberties and rights.

    2. @Adolescent Advocate Your adament one-size-fits-all claims, do speak volumes. What I’m getting here, is that this served _you_ well. I’m glad for it, but it does not do the same for the overwhelming majority of people.

      And cognitive therapy is an essential part of learning to live a good, fulfilling life without your ailment(s) holding you or your quality of life back any more than what’s inescapable – for any cronic / long term ailment. Same with depression and anxiety for most people, medication (if you ever find one that actually works for you) is only one part of the equation.

    3. @Adolescent Advocate I’m glad you only experienced 2 of the listed side effects, hopefully it weren’t 2 trouble some ones, or at significant levels (significant to you). But surely you understand that your sample group of 1 might possibly not be reprrsentative of all others, right? That you individually didn’t experience intolerable side effects of one particular medication, doesn’t mean the other 15-20 side effects on the list are irrelevant – they’re there because patients taking it have experienced them. There are literally thousands of these kinds on the market today, all with _some_ effects on _some_ patients (so they’re not actual duds), and for the most part we’re no closer to cracking this nut pharmaceutically.

    4. @Adolescent Advocate Do you keep missing my point, or are you dodging it on purpose? I’m not knocking pharaceutical aid in _getting through_ these kinds of challenges (or learning to _live with_ them – it’s not a finite struggle for many). _I’m actually on 2 of them myself._

      What I’m saying is it’s not as simple, easy, quick-fix or one-size as you make it out to be. Not with the meds, nor therapy. And cognitive therapy is a critical component of this process for millions of people – especially those who have minimal effect and help from medication (which is honestly more than 1/3rd of patients, after having tried at least 3 different ones at different dosages) – and those for whom the ailments last many years, or life-long. Quality cognitive therapy isn’t meant to be the only tool of treatment, nor is medication – they’re both meant as parts of s toolbox. This is a field that needs a multi-prong approach, not a spear. Because the spear may be quite effective, but only to a _tiiiny_ group of patients. Quality therapy helps you understand what’s going on within yourself, how you function and react, how various types of thoughts, actions (and inactions) have what effect on you. And use this information to shape a skill, that enable you to understand yourself, and counter detrimental impulses and inactions. Self-help as a general principle is essential, but the vast majority of people do need help and guidance to learn how. How we “work”, react, “misfire”, our thought patterns, background, brain and hormone chemistry, our offs and ons, other compounding and complicating ailments etc, is so extremely individual and the sum unique, that most prongs of the approach must be tailored to esch individual, and expect a big dose of trial and error. A good therapist will help you understand, observe, learn and hone those skills, but it takes time. Because we’re as unique as we are, and so our ailments, tve therapist need to learn “you”, for their help and guidance to work well. Group therapy can be really helpful for many patents too. It can be extremely difficult to “observe ourselves”, but by observing and learning from others with _similar(!)_ challenges, we can often extrapolate good information, recognize elements and patterns from our own lives, and understand how those things relate to each other.

  2. I have taken voluntary redundancy because I would have gotten fired for all the mistakes I made working from home. I am worried that I might never go back to feeling happy again.

    1. You’re not alone. I find myself in a similar position. If it offers a glimmer of hope I did smile for the first time in what seemed like months the other day. My neighbour painted a mural on her front wall. It looked awful but was bright and composed of primary colours. Found myself just grinning at how ridiculous it looked. Keep an eye out for the absurd and the world will look a little bit brighter.

  3. It feels a bit oxymoronic, I know. But here’s the situation. If the population does not (re)act *_AS IF_* we are heading into a 4th wave, ASAP – then we will be *_IN_* a 4th wave in 2-3 weeks.

  4. I m not, I actually enjoy more time with my kids, yes money issues just like everybody else.

    but now I work to live rather than living to work

  5. It is not right that people spread Covid 19, my niece opped out of nursing to stay safe and not be over worked…nurses and doctors are tired of Covid 19 deniers…

  6. being nuts is on a sliding scale . more or less a popular guess . get the shots. if not for yourself for the safety of the rest of the people.

  7. Seattle and Washington State are doing pretty well in our phased recovery, but now the biggest home of the P1 *Brazil* variant–outside of Brazil–is the Canadian province of British Columbia, just two hours north. It’s a bit nerve-wracking. Good luck, BC!

    1. Fauci said that even when people get vaccinated we will still have to social distance and wear masks. Completely divorce yourself from reality. Please find your way to your basement and quarantine until next christmas. Covid cant get you down there.

    2. @Ben You’re a full-time basement dweller and ignorant of reality. Your statement is false and misleading. But you are too slow to understand it.

    3. @JJ Strumr No I’m a multi-billionaire. I have friends in the CDC and they are saying the safest place to be is hiding in your basement with the lights off. Covid can spread through light particles.

    4. THE SOONER WE STOP LETTING THE GOVERNMENT TELL US HOW TO LIVE, THE SOONER WE WILL BE BACK TO NORMAL. THE FACT IS WE WERE NORMAL UNTIL WE ALLOWED THE GOVERNMENT AND THE MEDIA TELL U.S. CITIZENS HOW TO LIVE THEIR LIVES.

  8. 14 months of sheltering in place, Exhausted living with grief, moving, losing a partner and pet, still we’re all in it together, long walks to keep spirits up, at 70, still waiting on vaccine in western Massachusetts vaccine appointment scheduled tomorrow!

    1. @Andrea Cuchetto yes, glad to hear, my eldest son and wife in Denver50 got theirs too! My daughter & husband 41, living in Cambridge fully vaccinated as well.

    2. Hang in their, buddy. Hope your grief might be lighter with s new pet? It is so hard losing loved ones, especially our pets. My two cats are 13 years old, am very glad I still have them.

    3. God bless. Here in Canada my 74 y/o mom is getting her shot tomorrow. I don’t know when my turn will be.

  9. I’m seeing a psychiatrist. My kids are speaking to a psychiatrist, we have to because this pandemic has left us drained and depressed.

    1. @Mili M I’d love to see some examples of animals dying off because of mental health issues, or anything suggesting that a biological force is at play regarding deteriorating mental health in humans.

      Go on, which journal will be you referencing from?

      If you can’t come up with any data, I can only assume you are spewing nonsense, and probably projecting quite a bit, which given that most of your comments are accusatory and derogatory is probably true.

  10. We’re fully vaccinated, healthy and alive. Happy to hear that the rest of our family will get theirs soon

  11. NB: Scott Gottlieb = FORMER CDC director. There is no conflicting messaging coming out of the Biden Administration.

  12. Im sick to death literally of”insult to Independenc”e to having the vaccine. When sharing in the same hemisphere are people who have the right to a healthy life insulted by hard heads who wouldn’t shut up and roll up their sleeves.

  13. Good advice hopefully.

    Work out; whether inside or out.

    This will solve many, but not all issues derived from being cooped up indoors for long periods of time. Now that I recall, working out did help me out through long deployments on ships while in the Marines.

    As I prepared for a possible collapse of America prior to elections, I doomsday prepped my basement with not only food, but a decent quality elliptical.

    That elliptical has definitely helped my family through these trying times and paid off itself in usage and keeping the calories in check as well as keep my fragile mind somewhat sane.

    Good luck everybody, be safe, and stay sane.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.